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mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. he dubbed himself the reconstruction president and made earthquake recovery his top priority. he is here in new york for the united nations general assembly. i am very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. first of all, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: tell me about the earthquake and how you approached that. >> it was the fifth worst earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more than 500 lives. there are
of us can leave a lasting legacy will be on our time at birth. the new text is called "outlive your life." also, a special performance from john mellencamp. it is in stores this week. author and preacher max lucado and a special performance from john mellencamp. >> his name is james and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide is proud to join tavis a. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- tavis: max lucado is a renowned preacher who sit -- preaches in san antonio. he is a best-selling author whose books have sold more than a 55 million copies around the world. his latest text is called "outlive your life: if you were made to make a difference." thank you for joining us. i was immediately struck by this book because of the title. how
, that collectively it is about who we choose to represent us. it is about the words they speak and the message they bring and what it is that they reflect and emulate, and that those people, when we cannot necessarily rely on what our spirit says, can help us identify and understand what is resonating in us, even when it is uncomfortable. i have been lucky. since the very beginning of my career, from the moment i work with michael jackson until now, i have had the same manager who has always been on a course of enlightenment and consciousness and has been a great source of strength, and he has run at me with people i can count on. tavis: you mentioned obama, and i will get back to michael jackson. >> i just wanted to make sure that use all the hair. tavis: we will bring that back. hold up that photo? i want to see that again. i have to ask about obama. you got political during the campaign this last time around. has that been a journey for you? >> i have always been political. when i was a kid, when i got to vote for the first time, my mother was a democrat and a father was republican. secretl
're already important for us. because many conflicts are around us. so therefore our attempt, our word and our insistence to contribute to the solution of the problems is appreciated. >> couric: and the prime minister of the palestinian authority, salam fayyad. >> it's one that's based definitely on dealing violence out of the equation for sure. that's our interest. that's how we defined it. from our point of view. it happens to be consistent with obligations that we took on the road map and going back to 1993. it's in our best interest, we're not doing no one else a favor but ourselves when we subscribe to nonviolence. as a really key component to what we have to do to get to freedom. >> couric: a program note: our interview with the c.e.o. of google, eric schmidt, will be seen at a later date. tonight, the president of turkey and the prime minister of the palestinian authority when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: abdullah gul is here, he's the president of turkey, a key u.s. ally and nato member, turke
is not very solid. it's about $30 sml a years which which is peanuts compared to what the u.s. has with china, with the european union. but the potential is huge. >> rose: and we conclude with one of the most interesting entrepreneurs in all of china, he is jack ma. his company is alled alibaba. >> core competence of our companies, we have 20,000, grow from 18 people, now 20,000 people. and we focus a lot on the making sure the culture, everybody works for helping others instead of just making money. and we believe different from wall street, we believe customer number one, employee two, shareholder three. >> rose: customer one, employee, two, shareholder three? >> yes, again, this is my religion. >> rose: russia and the world, china and technology when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama came to office promising to reset relations with russia. he and russian president dmitry medvedev appeared to form a personal bond. they have since signed a nuclear arms reduction treaty-- now waiting to be
and reward system involves several different brain regions that communicate using chemical signals called neurotransmitters. the this circuit helps us to repeat the behaviors that make us happy while avoiding those that make us miserable. but as any adult knows, pleasure is not always good for you. tonight we'll also explore particularly dangerous forms of pleasure-seeking, addiction. long considered to be a moral weakness, addiction is now understood to be a biological disease. finally, we will explore the role that emotions play in decision-making and social interaction. next month, in part two of the emotional brain, we will turn our focus to negative emotions such as fear and anxiety. joining us tonight, a group of scientists who have devoted their lives to understanding the emotional brain. daniel salzman, he studies how the brain assigns an emotional value to the information that it receives from the five senses. he is an assistant professor of sky tri and neuroscience at columbia university. wolfram schultz. he studies how the brain's reward systems affect decision-making and learn
, a former baghdad chief for "the new york times." also with us tonight, laura lippman, with her new novel "i'd know you anywhere." john burns and author laura lippman. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis smiley in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] >> ending this war is not in the interest of iraq. it is in our own. the united states has paid a huge price to put the future of iraq in the hands of its people. we have said our young men and women to make enormous sacrifices in iraq -- we have sent them. we have persevered because of a belief we share with the iraqi people, a belief that out of war, a new beg
in florida with democratic candidate kendrick meek0 also with us is a musical legend dr. john from new orleans. he is the most visible ambassador for his town. along with his band, he is out with a new cd. join us tonight for kendrick meek and dr. john. >> all leno is his name is james and he needs extra help with his reading. >> james? >> yes. >> everyone making a difference. you help us live better. >> nationwide supports tavis in working to improve financial literacy and removing obstacles to financial empowerment one conversation at time. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: perhaps nowhere is there more attention paid in the senate race in florida. kendrick meek is the four term congressman who recently won the nomination for the senate seat. he joins us from miami. first of all, congratulations. it is an honor to have you on the program. >> thank you. i am honored to be here. tavis: usually it is the big election where you have to come out with the big guns blazing. it must feel lik
sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. one word describes the mood of american businesses these days-- "uncertainty." susie, many companies are flush with cash, but they're not spending it or using it to hire workers because they're uncertain about the outlook on a host of important issues. >> susie: whether it's taxes, tom, new regulations, or health care reform, executives are not sure how these policies will impact their businesses. many economists say that uncertainty is a significant obstacle to economic recovery. >> tom: lawmakers return next week to washington, and republicans are expected to reopen debate on parts of healthcare reform. as stephanie dhue reports that'll add even more uncertainty to the business environment. >> as the november election draws near, senate republicans are sharpening their differences with democrats on health care. senator mike johanns says new requirements for small business tax filing have to go. he's making a case for that on youtube. >> this will mean a mountain of new paperwork for as many as 40 million businesses and ot
a third happened here. we joined british and u.s. marines as they prepared for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons and reflect on the sacrifices that have been made. commanders were keen to show us what they achieved, all the project have -- how the province has prospered and how much safer and has become, but this is what we saw. [gunshots fired] a brutal fight for much of the day. it does not happen much anymore, but it shows the taliban battling coalition troops. and now america must finish the job britain started. no british troops at this time, they have faced too many days like this. >> i find it very difficult to talk about. without someone having been there, you cannot describe the smells, the sites, even pictures don't seem to work. you have to be there and, the emotions -- to have a true understanding of what people here go through. >> handing over to the americans is a bittersweet mellon for the troops. there happen -- they are happy to be going, but their regret the mission is far from over. >> the amount of effort, time, live
help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: always a pleasure to have ken burns on this program. he has once again turn his attention to america's pastime for a new documentary called " baseball: at the 10th inning," airing on most pbs stations on september 28. here is a scene from that documentary. >> far base ball players have succumbed to societal pressures to improve themselves, they are no worse than we are. >> people get upset. who in the whole country would not take a pill to take more money at your job? you would. if i said there was a pill in you'd get paid like steven spielberg, you would take the pill. tavis: ken burns joins us from charlotte, north carolina. is that chris rock peace convincing? >> no, it is fun
is important and facebook is a consequence and very impressive company. and social information will be used by google and by others, i should add, to make the quality of the results, the quality of the experience that much better. the pore we foe about what your friends do with your permission, and i need to say that about 500 times, we can actually use that to improve the experience you have of getting information that you care about. in our case what we're actually do something building social information into all of our products. so it won't be a social network the way people think of facebook but rather social information about who your friends are, people that you interact with. and we have various ways in which we will be collecting that information. >> we continue with the film wall street money never sleeps with the director all i ver stone and two of the jars, josh brolin and shia labeouf. >> the 2 o 008 market is more difficult to understand with credit default swaps and insurance and all that stuff. but we made it a background. that's the way we treated it. we treated the crisis,
in france is being watched closely, because europe faces us see us strikes as governments bareback cherished benefits. bbc news, paris. >> the spanish prime minister and has called on a basket separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. -- of basque separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. mozambique has reversed its decision to raise bread prices by 30%. food riots last week left 13 dead. bread will now be sold at its previous price of 14 cents. every year since 1998, more than 30,000 japanese people have killed themselves. japan's health ministry estimates cases of suicide and depression caused the economy $32 billion last year. the government has launched a task force to address the problem. more than two weeks of political deadlock have ended in australia with confirmation that labor's julia gillard will continue as prime minister, would be backing, at last, of to independenct mp's. she has been near west possible majority. nick bryant has this. >> it is like the finale of a tv reality show, with the winner kept a closely-guarded secret until announced live on television.
are joining us. and we are remembering jefferson thomas, all coming up. et >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: john boyd, jr. is president of the national black farmers' association. he held a press conference to highlight the failure of the congress to approve a settlement. he joins us tonight from new york. good to have you. >> good to be here, and i want to thank you for being involved with the black farmers and continuing to raise the issue. tavis: it is my pleasure, and i wanted to have you on tonight because after years of dealing with this, all that needs
joined us. a conversation with philip seymour hoffman. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. your side ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org tavis: always pleased to welcome philip seymour hoffman to this program. he has established himself as one of the best of his generation. his latest project is called "jack goes bowling." also directs and produces it. here now is a scene from the movie. >> [inaudible] >> i am almost getting there. >> may be a little good night kiss? >> maybe. >> nothing overwhelming. >> ok. >> good night. it is your directorial debut of a film. we have a monitor in the studio. i saw you look at it. you looked away. what do you think of your work? >> it is funny. i have been wa
memoir. we are glad to have joined us. join us for a ethan bronner air and james l. roy, coming up. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: u.s. special envoy george mitchell is on an emergency mission to rescue the latest efforts for peace in the region. i am joined from jerusalem by ethan bronner. thanks for your time, a bit too heavy on the program tonight, sir pitt >> is a pleasure to be here. tavis: let me start with the obvious, the thing that has raised this level of concern so high tonight on the scale. israel, on sunday, allowed the moratorium on jewish settlements being built in the west bank, that allow
tasks smoothly and easily. it allows us to move and to speak and to interact with our surroundings, requiring only minimal amount of effort. but when the brain is damaged, its true complex sit revealed. our subject this evening is the neurological disorders. these include parkinson's disease. stroke. huntington's disease and spinal chord injury. these conditions have taught us more about our brain than any other kind of brain disease. through parkinson's we have learned about movement. through stroke we have learned about speech. and through spinal cord injuries we have learned how thoughts give rise to actions. neurological diseases have been a topic of research for sent yees but-- century bus only recently have we developed effective treatments. this evening we will meet a group of scientists who have developed ways to repair or bypass the disordered brain. john done o hew. his work allowed paralyzed patients to move and communicate using only their thoughts and a machine called a brain computer interface. he is a professor at brown university and co-founder of a company called c
and doesn't help the u.s. economic recovery. but geithner said he was not prepared to label china a "currency manipulator" under u.s. law. >> tom: that reluctance was all too familiar to members of congress, and they grilled geithner with hostile questions. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: even the senators grilling the treasury secretary today admit hearings on china's overvalued currency have become something of a ritual over the years. it begins with the expression of outrage from senators like new york's charles schumer. >> at a time when the u.s. economy is trying to pick itself up off the ground, china's currency manipulation is like a boot to the throat of our recovery. and this administration refuses to try to take that boot off our neck. >> reporter: then, it's the treasury secretary's turn to share concern, to offer tougher rhetoric, and then to explain that declaring china a currency manipulator under the current law will do little more than require more consultations, as treasury secretary geithner explained today. >> wishing something does not make it so, and issuin
on afghanistan? 1,201 u.s. soldiers have died in afghanistan over the last nine years. as of july so far in 2010 alone. >> question, does president obama have an exit strategy for afghanistan? pat buchanan? >> he does not. they are moving away from the mid 2011 deadline from the beginning of withdrawal of troops to show we are committed for a longer period of time. john, the problem is, we can't win the war with the forces we have in there. everybody knows it. however, the country is divided. the administration is divided. they don't want to lose this war and have the taliban execute. they don't want to keep bleeding the country either. they have a real problem in this sense. the liberal ring of the democratic party is moving away from the administration and there's a small antiwar conservative movement that is growing in the media and on capitol hill. so we are coming to a head in december when they had the december review of afghanistan. >> eleanor. >> i don't think they are working away from the july 2011 to begin exiting and they have a review planned for the end of december. and general
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the u.s. moved into what is planned as its final military phase in iraq today after ending its combat role. newshour correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: cleaning up and packing-- that's what u.s. soldiers were doing on bases across iraq today. humvees rolled on to flatbed trucks and rows of equipment awaited transport home. last night, president obama marked the formal end of combat operations in iraq with a speech from the oval office. >> our combat mission is ending, but our commitment to iraq's future is not. this new approach reflects our long-term partnership with iraq , one based upon mutual interest and mutual respect. >> reporter: today, american military leaders marked the occasion with a change in command of the remaining 50,000 troops in iraq. vice president biden and defense secretary gates were among those presiding at the main u.s. military headquarters on the outskirts of baghdad. >> i pray that all those scarred by this war in iraq come to know the bond of lasting peac
. and it may have been the lowest of the four elections held since u.s. forces ousted the taliban in 2001. there were also allegations of rampant fraud. >> we have seen ballot stuffing, proxy vote, underage voting, and also multiple voting. the most serious one is the ballot stuffing. our observers have observed in more than-- in around 280 centers in 28 provinces where the ballot stuffing did occur. >> reporter: afghanistan's leading election observation group called today for an independent investigation. also today president karzai spokesmen agreed that the fraud allegations warranted a second look. >> like any other election anywhere in the world this there are complaints there have been irregularities. but we are waiting for the respective organizations to investigate these complaints. and they should be the source of information to the afghan people about the existence of irregularities or fraud. >> reporter: at the same time, the afghan electoral commission criticized observer groups for being too quick to imply the election was tainted. still former foreign minister abdullah abdul
. >> reporter: vincent reinhart used to help the fed meet its dual mandate as a senior policy adviser. with unemployment at close to 10%, he says it's clear the economy isn't operating anywhere close to maximum employment, which is closer to 5%. and what about price stability? indicators of core inflation are under 1%, with many prices flat or falling. but that isn't the same as price stability. >> it's possible to have too much of a good thing. >> reporter: why? because periods of high unemployment tend to push prices down and prices are not stable when they are rising or falling too much. >> as inflation starts falling and maybe even veering into deflation, the real value of what you have to pay back goes up and up and up. so it's harder for people who borrow, including the u.s. government, in that regard. >> reporter: with the fed failing to meet either of its mandates, economist josh bivens says the conclusion is clear. >> you're missing both mandates, but in the same direction for once. we're not acting aggressively enough to drive down unemployment, and we're not even acting agg
to close their markets. >> susie: that's u.s. trade rep ron kirk. he joins us for an exclusive interview about our trade issues with china. you're watching "nightly business report" for thursday, september 23. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. president obama today met with china's premier in new york city, and, susie the leaders of the world's two biggest economies pledged to work together on boosting the global recovery. >> susie: but tom, in their public remarks, the men didn't talk about china's undervalued currency. instead, that's said to have topped the agenda for their private meeting. the issue-- keeping china's currency artificially low puts american exports at a disadvantage overseas. >> tom: lawmakers in washington, meantime, are closer than ever to acting on threats to penalize china over its currency. earlier today, i c
of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, theen engine that connects us. >> chevron. this is the power of human energy. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation, supporting science, technology and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama spent this labor day in the midwest to rally with union members and unveil a new plan to promote job growth. but even as he sharpend his focus on the economy, his political opponents sharpened their responses. >> around the nation this holiday, parades, barbecues and a continuing unease over the dismal jobs market. coming just after friday's report showing unemployment had edgeded up again to 9.6%, this was a labor day in which the state of the american work force was very much front and center. with that in mind and with a mid-term election just two months off
>> rose: welcome to our program. tonight, stephanie d'alessandro and john elderfield take us on a tour of a new matisse exhibit at the museum of modern art. >> it's a period when matisse really seemed to have very intently stopped the kind of work he was doing before and began searching for something and we can chart him through the evolution of "bathers by a river" in fact and then i think through "the exhibition" trying different modes of painting. bringing together different styles, avant-garde styles of the time, ways of making the surface of works very different and reworked. and we watch him not sure where he's going but excited about the possibility of a new kind of art for himself and we feel that for matisse that was a kind of radical invention. he said about "bathers by a river" and "moroccans" that they were two of the most pivotal works of his career. i think it's important he used the word "pivotal" and not "important." it suggests there was a change that those works brought about in his career and i think that's part of what that radical invention is about. >> i
in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the sanctions does not work. one of those is former pr
in europe and the possible threat in the u.s. >> brown: margaret warner examines china's growing economic and military assertiveness in asia and globally. >> they're breaking diplomatic egg which is three or four years ago they would not have broken. so i think the change is palpable. >> woodruff: we talk to former clinton administration secretary of labor robert reich-- the last in our series of conversations on extending the bush-era tax breaks. >> brown: and jonathan miller of "independent television news" reports from northwest pakistan, where relief-aid is still slow in coming two months after the floods began. >> this is one of the worst affected areas in pakistan, but these people industrial no safe water, no food, no shelter, no medicine. something has gone very wrong. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i want to know what the universe... >> looks like. >> feels like. >> from deep space. >> to a microbe. >> i can contribute to the world by pursuing my passion for science. >> it really is the key to the
parliamentary elections. some of the political players may decide to use violence themselves as a pressure point. >> lehrer: newshour correspondent spencer michels examines the impact of u.s. supreme court rulings on local gun regulations in california. >> among the first results of the supreme court decisions on guns: gun shows like this may become more common in california. >> woodruff: plus an encore look at jeffrey brown's profile of tap dance great maurice hines passing the torch and tradition to a new generation. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the east coast kept a weather eye on the sea today, waiting for the arrival of hurricane earl. the storm weakened some during the day, but still had winds of 115 miles an hour. in kill devil hills, north carolina, the day dawned on a relativel
, and thanks for joining us. too little too late. susie, that's the initial reaction from some business leaders to president obama's latest proposal to give tax breaks for businesses. >> susie: tom, the president will detail the plan tomorrow in cleveland. he's proposing that companies write off 100% of their investments in plants and equipment through next year. >> tom: the administration estimates the plan would cut business taxes by about $200 billion over the next two years. for some businesses, this "expensing" proposal could amount to a half-off sale on new equipment. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: you've probably heard about all those businesses sitting on their money, waiting for things to get better. the president's expensing plan could give executives an incentive to make a big purchase, says small business advocate todd mccracken. >> and what that does is it uses up a lot of extra cash that especially a lot of big companies seem to have right now bur that they're not using, they're not investing. and that has the potential to create jobs. >> reporter: but business groups are luke
, corporations. >> question, by the way, the word stimulous is apparently now not used. the president's job approval rating is low. historically so. did this week put president obama back on an upward track? pat buchanan. >> no it did not, john. there's no doubt he was in campaign mode and spoke more eloquently there. he mentioned john boehner and attacked him by name seven times and nobody in the country knows who john boehner is. secondly the mosque issue and the issue of the burning korans was a tremendous distraction all week. third, his proposal, some of which are interesting, credits like that. they are too little, they are too late. frankly some of his rhetoric, they treat me like a dog is getting pity me, it doesn't come off well. >> what is the political part on obama's part? >> you have to put a face on the opposition and mr. boehner is a pretty good face. he has been in the congress since 1990. he was part of the gingrich revolution in 1995. he was video taped on the house floor handing out checks from the tobacco industry to members while they were discussing ending tobacco su
and in congress is if you propose something that's bold, that touches these third rails, the other side will use it as a political weapon against you so don't dare try. we have to get off, if we court start tackling the fiscal problem, it will tack ale lot. what i do the point i'm trying to make is we do this now and get our prosperity agenda. what i mean when i say this is my plan says nothing changes for anybody 35 and above. -- 55 and above, so if you are 10 years away from retiring we can guarantee your benefit, if you are 54 and below you know the programs won't be the samement you know that the social insurance safety net system we have is imploding. we need to reform it to fix it. i use a few values and principals on how i fix those things am i go kif-- i can give you details if you like. the point i make is do it now, preema debt crisis, if he kick the can down the road it will be austerity to everybody. tax increases to current workers that is the pain plan we should avoid that. >> rose: i meant by dismantle, just dismantle in the traditional way that it works. in other words, you can u
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 240 (some duplicates have been removed)